Subscribe to our newsletter, get our FREE ebook.

* indicates required
Close

Worcestershire Sauce, Easy for You To Say

January 6th, 2010

I know it’s only been in the US since Lea and Perrins brought it over from the UK in 1837, but it’s about time we get it right.  It’s been a problem for far too long.  I myself used to mumbled my way through it like this fella:

Not this year though.  It’s “worse-ta-sure“.  I think “worse-ta-sheer” is also acceptable, but never, EVER, “war-chester-shire“.  As a matter of fact, that may be a New Year’s resolution I can stick with for 2010.  I am now making it my mission to educate people and finally eradicate WarChesterShire from the English language.  Who’s with me?

View Related Recipes, Tips & News: ,

7 Responses

avatar

Reggie

06-10-2011

Just found this! lol…too funny and I agree….

avatar

Reema

12-28-2011

That was enlightening!

avatar

Tajee

01-07-2012

That’s funny. I saw heard a cook say that on Diners, Dive-ins and Dives, with Guy Fieri and the cook said “WarChesterShire” and Guy was like “That’s how you say it, huh?” he was like “Yeah”. I’ve never heard it like that until that show. It was really funny.

avatar

John Kitchen

03-11-2012

Although the guy in the commercial does pronounce the name of the county correctly, real Englishmen ignore the ‘shire’ part and simply pronounce it ‘Wuster’ – the ‘u’ being as in ‘nut’. however it is pronounced, it’s great. (As Americans can’t pronounce Derby or Alnwick properly, who cares?)

avatar

Me

05-12-2012

It’s Wista-sha. Worcester, in MA, is Wista, or Wursta. Shire is for the UK. Sha is fine.

avatar

Melanie

10-02-2012

My south african hubby always said “wuster” sauce, but no one here in North America knew what on earth he was talking about. So now he painfully has to draw out “wor-chest-er-shur” sauce to make himself understood, as he can’t eat a cooked breakfast without it… you gotta say what you gotta say.

Leave a Reply

Search Grilling Tips and News: